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Varun Rai
Policy Briefs

ESI Bulletin: The Real Drivers of Carbon Capture and Storage in China

Richard K. Morse, Varun Rai, Gang He
ESI Bulletin , 2010

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is now widely viewed as imperative for global climate stabilisation. Coal is the world’s fastest growing fossil fuel, and coal combustion is now the largest single source of anthropogenic CO2 emissions.

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Journal Articles

Promoting Clean Development Competing Market Mechanisms Post-2012

Varun Rai
Harvard International Review , 2009

(Excerpt) According to climate scientists, averting the worst consequences of climate change requires that the increase in global temperature should be limited to 2°C (or 3.6°F). to achieve that objective, global emissions of green house gases (GHGs)—the main human cause of global warming—must be reduced to 50 percent of 1990 levels by 2050.

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Journal Articles

Climate Change and the Energy Challenge: A Pragmatic Approach for India

Varun Rai, David G. Victor
Economic and Political Weekly , 2009

India has been famous for arguing that it (and the rest of the developing world) should incur no expense in controlling emissions that cause climate change. The west caused the problem and it should clean it up. That argument is increasingly untenable — both in the fundamental arithmetic of climate change, which is a problem that is impossible to solve without developing country participation, and in the political reality that important western partners will increasingly demand more of India and other developing countries. India’s own public is also demanding more.

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Working Papers

Real Drivers of Carbon Capture and Storage in China and Implications for Climate Policy

Richard K. Morse, Varun Rai, Gang He
Program on Energy and Sustainable Development Working Paper #88 , 2009

The capture and permanent storage of CO2 emissions from coal combustion is now widely viewed as imperative for stabilization of the global climate.  Coal is the world’s fastest growing fossil fuel.  This trend presents a forceful case for the development and wide dissemination of technologies that can decouple coal consumption from CO2 emissions—the leading candidate technology to do this is carbon capture and storage (CCS). 

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Working Papers

Role of Carbon Capture Technologies in Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Models: A Parametric Study for the U.S. Power Sector

Varun Rai, John Bistline
Program on Energy and Sustainable Development, Working Paper #85 , 2009

This paper analyzes the potential contribution of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies to greenhouse gas emissions reductions in the U.S.

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Working Papers

Climate Change and the Energy Challenge: A Pragmatic Approach for India

Varun Rai, David G. Victor
Program on Energy and Sustainable Development, Working Paper #83 , 2009

India has been famous for arguing that it (and the rest of the developing world) should incur no expense in controlling emissions that cause climate change.  The west caused the problem and it should clean it up.  That argument is increasingly untenable-both in the fundamental arithmetic of climate change, which is a problem that is impossible to solve without developing country participation, and in the political reality that important western partners will increasingly demand more of India and other developing countries. India's own public is also demanding more. 

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Working Papers

Carbon Capture and Storage at Scale: Lessons from the Growth of Analogous Energy Technologies

Varun Rai, David G. Victor, Mark C. Thurber
Program on Energy and Sustainable Development, Working Paper #81 , 2009

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is a promising technology that might allow for significant reductions in CO2 emissions. But at present CCS is very expensive and its performance is highly uncertain at the scale of commercial power plants. Such challenges to deployment, though, are not new to students of technological change. Several successful technologies, including energy technologies, have faced similar challenges as CCS faces now.

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Policy Briefs

Changing Face of the Indian Energy System: A March Towards Normalcy

Varun Rai
University of Pennsylvania's Center for the Advanced Study of India , 2008

Much has been said about the fallacies in India’s energy policy - a lack of coherent planning, endemic ills of cross-subsidies, inefficiencies of state-owned companies, and so on - to argue the impossibility of India’s ability to meet the energy demands of a growing economy. Although true in past, this argument is weakening. Amidst excessive criticism of every single government action, the real, but subtle, face of Indian energy policy has not attracted mass attention yet. And understandably so:

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Working Papers

PESD Carbon Storage Project Database

Varun Rai, Ngai-Chi Chung, Mark C. Thurber, David G. Victor
Program on Energy and Sustainable Development Working Paper #76 , 2008

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is among the technologies with greatest potential leverage to combat climate change. According to the PRISM analysis, a technology assessment performed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), wide deployment of CCS after 2020 in the US power sector alone could reduce emissions by approximately 350 million tonnes of CO2 per year (Mt CO2/yr) by 2030, a conclusion echoed by the McKinsey U.S. Mid-range Greenhouse Gas Abatement Curve 2030.

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Working Papers

Energy and India's Foreign Policy

Jeremy Carl, Varun Rai, David G. Victor
Program on Energy and Sustainable Development Working Paper #75 , 2008

This study was presented by PESD research fellows Jeremy Carl and Varun Rai and PESD Director David Victor at the conference The Future of India's Foreign Policy, hosted by the Center for the Advanced Study of India (CASI) at the University of Pennsylvania on April 22 and 23, 2008.

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